How to Convert a Text Layer to an Image in Photoshop CS5

One simple way to add some personalization to an image you are creating in Photoshop CS5 is through the use of a unique font. It can completely change the way an image looks, without requiring any advanced artistic skill. Unfortunately, if you are working with someone else on the file, or if you are sending the image to a professional printer, they might not have the font. If you send a layered PDF or PSD file to someone with the text layer in its’ original state, and they do not have the font, it could drastically alter the appearance of the image. Fortunately you can learn how to convert a text layer to an image in Photoshop CS5. You can even follow the instructions in this article to then export the text layer as its’ own image, if you so choose.

 

Rasterizing Text Layers in Photoshop CS5

 

One important thing to be aware of before you convert a layer to a flat image, or rasterize it, is that the layer will no longer be editable with the type tool. Therefore, you should ensure that the type on the layer is finalized before you rasterize the layer. You can gain some additional information about rasterizing layers on Adobe’s website. To learn how to convert your text layer to an image, follow the steps below.

 

Step 1: Open the file containing the text layer that you want to convert to an image.

Step 2: Click the desired text layer from the Layers panel at the right side of the window. If your Layers panel is not visible, press the F7 key on your keyboard.

Step 3: Right-click the layer, then choose the Rasterize Type option.

how to convert a text layer to an image in photoshop cs5

 

You will note that the layer no longer displays the T symbol that identifies it as a type layer.

If you have multiple type layers that you want to rasterize, you can hold down the Ctrl key on your keyboard as you click each one to select it. You can then right-click any of the selected type layers and choose the Rasterize Type option to then rasterize all of the selected layers.

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